The harrowing moment


Hurry up’: The harrowing moment a dying front line soldier is caught on camera asking comrades for medical aid in scenes to be shown by BBC

  • Incidents leading to the deaths of two British troops will be shown on BBC Three tonight
  • Kingsman Darren Deady is seen being treated after he was shot in the chest by the Taliban, as medics try nine times to put him on a drip
  • Captain Andrew Griffiths is shown moments before he stepped on a mine
  • Then footage shows him being stretchered into a helicopter during a dangerous sand storm
  • Both men died from their wounds in September 2010

Heartbreaking scenes of British soldiers dying on the front line in Afghanistan will be shown on television tonight.

Rarely seen footage gathered using cameras attached to the helmets of troops first shows Kingsman Darren Deady just after he was shot in the chest.

The tragic soldier, who was described by his colleagues as having ‘the heart of a lion’, is seen lying on the floor asking medics to ‘hurry up’ as they try to insert a drip, after he was fatally wounded in the Nahr-e Saraj District of Helmand Province.

Captain Andrew Griffiths
Darren Deady

 Difficult to watch: Andrew Griffiths, left, and Darren Deady, right, are shown in the Our War documentary moments before and after they are fatally injured

Later in the film, called ‘Our War’, Captain Andrew Griffiths, who was a ‘rising star’ of the British Army, also of the 2nd Battalion Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, known as the ‘Lions of England’, is seen just moments before he stepped on a booby trap that eventually killed him.

He did not know that just feet in front of him were a string of mines that would take his life.

Footage then shows him being taken into a helicopter on a stretcher before being flown from the scene in a dangerous sand storm.

Both were brought back to Britain but Captain Griffiths succumbed to his injuries on September 5 2010 at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, with his parents at his bedside.

Tragically Kingsman Deady died five days later on September 10, at the same place.

22-year-old Darren Deady left school at 16 to join the Army and at the time of his death his family asked his bravery was not forgotten.

‘Darren was proud to do a job that he loved and most of all believed in, his little brother once turned round to him and asked him: “why do you fight?” and Darren simply replied; “To make a difference”,’ they said.

Injured: Kingsman Darren Deady lies injured on the floor in Afghanistan as fellow soldier attempt to insert a drip

Injured: Kingsman Darren Deady lies injured on the floor in Afghanistan as fellow soldier attempt to insert a drip

Colleagues described Captain Griffiths as a natural leader who was ‘the finest at everything he did’. He was praised as an ‘extremely personable, well-loved and highly respected’ officer.

His commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robbie Boyd, said: ‘The respect from his Lions was genuinely the most impressive I have seen in a young officer in my 24 years in the infantry.’

Captain Griffith’s friends and family spoke emotionally on the film, called Our War, about the incident that led to his death and the hell it has caused them.

Poignant: This photo captured Captain Griffiths just moments before he walked onto the mine that would eventually kill him

Poignant: This photo captured Captain Griffiths just moments before he walked onto the mine that would eventually kill him

Tragic: Captain Andrew Griffiths is brought into a helicopter on a stretcher after he was hit by a Taliban booby trap

Tragic: Captain Andrew Griffiths is brought into a helicopter on a stretcher after he was hit by a Taliban booby trap

Lieutenant Andy Miller said: ‘You’re looking at compound walls that are kind of 12 to 15 foot high, the dust went above it, and sat on top of the dust cloud, was the right angle of someone’s foot and leg.

Painful: Captain Griffiths' father Brigadier Mike Griffiths talked emotionally about the death of his son

Painful: Captain Griffiths’ father Brigadier Mike Griffiths talked emotionally about the death of his son

I remember screaming for the boss. I was screaming boss that high that it sounded like a baby screaming.

‘At first we didn’t realise that anything was wrong with him, I was shouting to him, I said “Boss are you alright?”, he was going yeah “I’m over here, I’m over here”.

‘It was then we realised that he was missing his lower part of his leg.’

Meanwhile after his son’s death, Brigadier Mike Griffiths has been helping train Army officers who have to deliver the news that a soldier has died in action.

‘The most difficult thing since his death is to come to terms with whether or not it was in a good cause,’ he said.

To not believe it was in a good cause would be to say to all those who’ve given their lives, to all those who’ve been wounded, to all those that have served there, that it was not the right thing to do.

‘Dying for your country on operations is something that comes all too often with the job and as long as there are young men and young women brave enough to step forward, we are a nation to be proud of.’

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